Psychometric Features of Relationship Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory: A scale in the Field of Relationship Obsessive- Compulsive Disorder

Document Type: Original Article

Authors

1 Department of Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Humanities, University of Shahed, Tehran, Iran

2 Department of Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Humanities, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran

Abstract

Abstract

Introduction: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric features of the Relationship Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory (ROCI) with a sample of the students of the universities in Tehran
Methods: The present study included 459 married students who were selected through available sampling method from universities in Tehran. This research was conducted in two steps. Firstly, after completing the translation steps, the final questionnaire was prepared.  In the second stage, the ROCI was implemented on students and its reliability was calculated; in addition, in order to examine convergent and divergent validities, ROCI was administered together with Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS), Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS), Relationship Beliefs Inventory (RBI), Padua Inventory-Washington State University Revision (PI-WSUR) and Obsessive Compulsive Inventory- Revised (OCI-R) scales.
Results: The internal consistency of ROCI was in the range of 0.66 to 0.89, which is significant at the level of p Conclusion: The ROCI demonstrated a good validity and reliability for being applied to Iranian couples.
Abstract

Introduction: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric features of the Relationship Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory (ROCI) with a sample of the students of the universities in Tehran
Methods: The present study included 459 married students who were selected through available sampling method from universities in Tehran. This research was conducted in two steps. Firstly, after completing the translation steps, the final questionnaire was prepared.  In the second stage, the ROCI was implemented on students and its reliability was calculated; in addition, in order to examine convergent and divergent validities, ROCI was administered together with Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS), Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS), Relationship Beliefs Inventory (RBI), Padua Inventory-Washington State University Revision (PI-WSUR) and Obsessive Compulsive Inventory- Revised (OCI-R) scales.
Results: The internal consistency of ROCI was in the range of 0.66 to 0.89, which is significant at the level of p Conclusion: The ROCI demonstrated a good validity and reliability for being applied to Iranian couples.

Keywords


References
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