The Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy on Improving Self-Care Skills among Women with Chronic Schizophrenia

Document Type: Original Article

Authors

1 Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Research Center, Ibn-Sina psychiatric Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran

2 Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Research Center, University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran

3 Associate Professor in Clinical Psychology, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran

4 Msc in Psychology, Payam Noor University of Garmsar, Garmsar, Iran

5 MSc in Psychiatric Nursing, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Research Center, Ibne-Sina psychiatric Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran

6 Ms in Islamic Psychology, Payam Noor University of Gonabad, Gonabad, Iran

7 Ph.D. Student in Nursing, Student Research Committee, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

10.30491/ijbs.2020.103857

Abstract

Introduction: Schizophrenia is a chronic, debilitating disease that imposes a great care of burden on families and mental health care providers. Therefore, the issue of self-care is very important in these patients, but few studies have addressed this issue.
Objective: This study examines the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral Group Therapy on improving self-care skills in women with chronic schizophrenia.
Method: Women with chronic schizophrenia were studied in two groups of intervention (N=9) and control (N=10) at Hejazi Hospital in Mashhad, Iran. The intervention group received cognitive-behavioral group therapy and the control group received routine care. The researcher-made self-care questionnaire was completed before intervention and six months after the intervention.
Findings: The results of the Mann-Whitney test indicated that there were significant difference between two groups. These difference were especially about variation in the mean of total score of self-care skills before and after intervention, (Z=3/56, p=0/001, Cohen’s d= 2/36) as well as before the intervention and six months after the intervention (z=2/01, p=0/04, Cohen’s d= 0/21).
Conclusion: Cognitive-behavioral Group Therapy can affect self-care skills in women with chronic schizophrenia

Keywords


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