The Effectiveness of Teaching Motivation Self-Regulatory Strategies in Academic Self-efficacy with the Moderating role of the Effects of Mastery-oriented and Performance-oriented Goals among Students

Document Type: Original Article

Authors

Department of Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran

Abstract

Introduction: In the time being, teaching self-regulation to learners is a critical concern which helps them to adapt themselves to changes and unpredictable events easily. Hence, the present study examined the effectiveness of teaching motivational self-regulation strategies in academic self-efficacy with the moderating role of the effects of mastery-oriented and performance-oriented goals among first-level high school students.
Method: The present study was a semi-experimental with a pre-test, post-test and a control group. The population consisted of 4752 grade 9 students in Karaj. The self-efficacy was measured among students. Data were then collected and multivariate analysis of covariance was used for data analysis.
Results: The results showed that teaching Motivational Self-Regulation Strategies (MSRSs) had a significant positive effect on students' academic self-efficacy (p<0.05), whereas the effect of teaching mastery-oriented and performance-oriented goals on self-efficacy was insignificant.
Conclusion: It can be concluded that teaching MSRSs has a positive effect on the academic self-efficacy of first-year high school students. However, performance-oriented and mastery-oriented goals cannot moderate the effects of teaching MSRSs on self-efficacy.

Keywords


Reference

1.   Busato VV, Prins FJ, Elshout JJ, Hamaker C. Intellectual ability, learning style, personality, achievement motivation and academic success of psychology students in higher education. Personality and Individual differences. 2000;29(6):1057-68.

2.   Chamorro-Premuzic T, Furnham A. Personality predicts academic performance: Evidence from two longitudinal university samples. Journal of research in personality. 2003;37(4):319-38.

3.   Zimmerman BJ, Pons MM. Development of a structured interview for assessing student use of self-regulated learning strategies. American educational research journal. 1986;23(4):614-28.

4.   Schunk DH, Zimmerman BJ. Self-regulation of learning and performance: Issues and educational applications: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc; 1994.

5.   Schunk DH, Zimmerman BJ. Self-regulated learning: From teaching to self-reflective practice: Guilford Press; 1998.

6.   Wolters CA. Self-regulated learning and college students' regulation of motivation. Journal of educational psychology. 1998;90(2):224.

7.   Bodrova E, Leong DJ. Promoting student self-regulation in learning. Education Digest. 2005;71(2):54.

8.   Kauffman DF. Self-regulated learning in web-based environments: Instructional tools designed to facilitate cognitive strategy use, metacognitive processing, and motivational beliefs. Journal of educational computing research. 2004;30(1-2):139-61.

9.   Pajares F, Britner SL, Valiante G. Relation between achievement goals and self-beliefs of middle school students in writing and science. Contemporary educational psychology. 2000;25(4):406-22.

10. Bandura A. Exercise of personal agency through the self-efficacy mechanism. Self-efficacy: Thought control of action. 1992;1:3-37.

11. Lynch DJ. Motivational factors, learning strategies and resource management as predictors of course grades. College Student Journal. 2006;40(2):423-9.

12. Turner JA, Ersek M, Kemp C. Self-efficacy for managing pain is associated with disability, depression, and pain coping among retirement community residents with chronic pain. The Journal of pain. 2005;6(7):471-9.

13. Muris P. Relationships between self-efficacy and symptoms of anxiety disorders and depression in a normal adolescent sample. Personality and individual differences. 2002;32(2):337-48.

14. Hajloo N, Sobhi-Garamaleki N, Baqeri S. The relationship of perfectionism, self-efficacy, conscientiousness and stress with procrastination. International Journal of Behavioral Sciences. 2012;6(4):307-14.

15. Midgley C, Maehr ML, Hruda LZ, Anderman E, Anderman L, Freeman KE, et al. Manual for the patterns of adaptive learning scales. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan. 2000.

16. Altunsoy S, Çimen O, Ekici G, Atik AD, Gökmen A. An assessment of the factors that influence biology teacher candidates’ levels of academic self-efficacy. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences. 2010;2(2):2377-82.

17. AA R. The mediating role of self-efficacy beliefs (general and social) on the relationship between negative self-statements and social anxiety. International Journal of Behavioral Sciences. 2015;9(1):85-94.

18. Schunk DH. Self-efficacy and academic motivation. Educational psychologist. 1991;26(3-4):207-31.

19. Ba┼čol G. Validity and reliability of Turkish form of children's self-efficacy scale on Turkish primary school students. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences. 2010;2(2):4082-6.

20. Elliot AJ. Integrating the “classic” and “contemporary” approaches to achievement motivation: A hierarchical model of approach and avoidance achievement motivation. Advances in motivation and achievement. 1997;10(7):143-79.

21. Ryan AM, Pintrich PR. " Should I ask for help?" The role of motivation and attitudes in adolescents' help seeking in math class. Journal of educational psychology. 1997;89(2):329.

22. Kaplan A, Maehr ML. Achievement goals and student well-being. Contemporary educational psychology. 1999;24(4):330-58.

23. Pintrich PR. The role of motivation in promoting and sustaining self-regulated learning. International journal of educational research. 1999;31(6):459-70.

24. Cury F, Elliot AJ, Da Fonseca D, Moller AC. The social-cognitive model of achievement motivation and the 2× 2 achievement goal framework. Journal of personality and social psychology. 2006;90(4):666.

25. Anderman EM, Maehr ML. Motivation and schooling in the middle grades. Review of educational Research. 1994;64(2):287-309.

26. Meece JL, Holt K. A pattern analysis of students' achievement goals. Journal of educational psychology. 1993;85(4):582.

27. Jinks J, Morgan V. Children's perceived academic self-efficacy: An inventory scale. The Clearing House. 1999;72(4):224-30.

28. Elliot AJ, McGregor HA, Gable S. Achievement goals, study strategies, and exam performance: A mediational analysis. Journal of educational psychology. 1999;91(3):549.

29. Elliot AJ, Murayama K. On the measurement of achievement goals: Critique, illustration, and application. Journal of Educational Psychology. 2008;100(3):613.

30. Alexiou A, Paraskeva F, editors. Exploiting motivation and self-efficacy through the implementation of self-regulated oriented ePortfolio. International Conference on E-Learning in the Workplace, NY, USA; 2013.

31. Ramdass D, Zimmerman BJ. Effects of self-correction strategy training on middle school students' self-efficacy, self-evaluation, and mathematics division learning. Journal of advanced academics. 2008;20(1):18-41.

32. Pintrich PR, De Groot EV. Motivational and self-regulated learning components of classroom academic performance. Journal of educational psychology. 1990;82(1):33.

33. Zimmerman BJ, Bandura A, Martinez-Pons M. Self-motivation for academic attainment: The role of self-efficacy beliefs and personal goal setting. American educational research journal. 1992;29(3):663-76.

34. Kitsantas A, Zimmerman BJ. College students’ homework and academic achievement: The mediating role of self-regulatory beliefs. Metacognition and Learning. 2009;4(2):97-110.

35. Pintrich PR. A conceptual framework for assessing motivation and self-regulated learning in college students. Educational psychology review. 2004;16(4):385-407.

36. Pintrich PR, Conley AM, Kempler TM. Current issues in achievement goal theory and research. International Journal of Educational Research. 2003;39(4-5):319-37.

37. Davari M, Gholamali Lavasani M, Ejei J. Relationship between perfectionism and academic self-efficacy with students achievement goals. Journal of Psychology. 2012;16(3):266-81.

38. Ames C. Classrooms: Goals, structures, and student motivation. Journal of educational psychology. 1992;84(3):261.

39. Pintrich PR, Garcia T. Student goal orientation and self-regulation in the college classroom. Advances in motivation and achievement: Goals and self-regulatory processes. 1991;7(371-402).

40. Pintrich PR, Smith DA, Garcia T, McKeachie WJ. Reliability and predictive validity of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ). Educational and psychological measurement. 1993;53(3):801-13.

41. Roebken H. Multiple Goals, Satisfaction, and Achievement in University Undergraduate Education: A Student Experience in the Research University (SERU) Project Research Paper. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE. 2.07. Center for Studies in Higher Education. 2007.

42. Wang CJ, Biddle SJ, Elliot AJ. The 2× 2 achievement goal framework in a physical education context. Psychology of sport and exercise. 2007;8(2):147-68.

43. Was CA. Academic achievement goal orientation: Taking another look. 2006.

44. Kaplan A, Flum H. Achievement goal orientations and identity formation styles. Educational Research Review. 2010;5(1):50-67.

45.               Lee JQ, McInerney DM, Liem GAD, Ortiga YP. The relationship between future goals and achievement goal orientations: An intrinsic–extrinsic motivation perspective. Contemporary Educational Psychology. 2010;35(4):264-79.