The Relations among Religiosity, Subjective Well-being, and Attitudes towards Science

Document Type: Original Article

Author

Assistant Professor, Department of Behavioral Sciences, Institute for Research and Development in the Humanities (SAMT)

Abstract

Abstract

Research in three last decades has linked religiosity with health and Subjective Well-Being (SWB), suggesting that religion leads to physical and mental health. Recently, it has been shown that science can often do the same. This study aims to investigate the relationship of religiosity and attitudes towards science to SWB. Two hundred and eighteen university students and 122 seminary school students were selected through non-random, convenience sampling and filled out the following scales: Scientific Attitude Assessment scale (SAAS), Spirituality Self-Rating Scale (SSRS), Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), and Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS). Results showed that religiosity was positively correlated with happiness and life satisfaction. Religious people reported more positive attitudes towards science, showing that at the personal level they do not see much of a conflict between their religion and contemporary science. Life satisfaction and happiness were also positively associated with positive attitudes towards science. While seminary school students reported higher levels of religiosity, university students reported higher scores on extrinsic attitudes towards science but not intrinsic attitudes. These results demonstrated the positive links between religiosity and attitudes towards science, suggesting that both religion and science can contribute to SWB.

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